Kids take a ‘fly-through’ of a brain surgeon’s virtual reality – Daily Pilot

When Davis Magnet School teacher Emily Matthews found out she’d be giving a lesson about the human brain as part of the science curriculum, she figured she should make it a hands-on experience for her sixth-graders.And it seemed a no-brainer to invite Dr. Robert Louis, program director of the Skull Base and Pituitary Tumor Program of the Hoag Neurosciences Institute, to share with Matthews’ class and two others how he uses virtual reality to prepare for surgeries. Google virtual reality headsets were placed on students’ desks at the Costa Mesa school Wednesday afternoon. But before they got to see a “fly-through” of the brain, Louis began with a presentation about his profession.The Boston native described neurosurgery as a “relatively young field” that still has way to go in advancing with technology. (function() {var s = document.createElement(“style”);s.innerHTML = “.trb_barker_polar_section{margin-bottom:20px}.trb_barker_polar_barkerTitle{display:inline-block;font:700 24px/30px sans-serif;margin:0 20px 0 0}.trb_outfit_sponsorship{position:relative;margin-bottom:-6px}.trb_outfit_sponsorship_presentedBy{display:inline-block;position:relative}.trb_outfit_sponsorship_presentedBy_a{color:#999;font:12px Arial,sans-serif;text-transform:uppercase;cursor:pointer;text-decoration:none}.trb_outfit_sponsorship_presentedBy_a:hover{color:#CCC}.trb_outfit_sponsorship_presentedBy_a:before{content:”;border-left:6px solid #999;border-bottom:4.7px solid transparent;border-top:4.7px solid transparent;display:inline-block;border-right:0;height:0;width:7px;position:relative}.trb_outfit_sponsorship_presentedBy_disclaimer{display:none;bottom:26px}.trb_outfit_sponsorship_presentedBy[data-state=base_expanded] .trb_outfit_sponsorship_presentedBy_disclaimer{display:inline-block;position:absolute;background:#333;border-radius:8px;color:#FFF;font:12px/14px Arial,sans-serif;padding:16px;width:218px;z-index:100;-webkit-font-smoothing:antialiased;-moz-osx-font-smoothing:grayscale;left:17px}.trb_outfit_sponsorship_presentedBy_disclaimer:before{content:”;position:absolute;bottom:-9px;border-style:solid;border-width:10px 10px 0;border-color:#333 transparent;z-index:1;width:0;left:34px}.trb_outfit_sponsorship_presentedBy_close{cursor:pointer;float:right}.trb_outfit_sponsorship_presentedBy_close:after{display:inline-block;font:14px trb_Icons;content:’\\00e5′;color:#FFF;position:absolute;top:12px;right:10px;padding:3px;cursor:pointer;z-index:100}@media (min-width:1060px){.trb_outfit_sponsorship{margin-bottom:0;min-width:290px;top:10px}.trb_outfit_sponsorship_presentedBy{float:left}.trb_outfit_sponsorship_presentedBy_disclaimer{bottom:28px}}”;document.head.appendChild(s);})(); Before the modern tools used now, patients would be left with dramatic skull deformations because brain surgeons would shave the scalp and then cut the skull apart to remove a tumor. Now, surgeons can discreetly remove a tumor by slicing under a person’s eyebrow.

Source: Kids take a ‘fly-through’ of a brain surgeon’s virtual reality – Daily Pilot

%d bloggers like this: